Mego 1979-1980


Star Trek 1979 -1980

Since Mego had such massive success with their Star Trek television series figures in the mid 1970’s, they decided to release a line based on the new Motion Picture movie in 1979. The new line consisted of twelve 3.75 inch figures and a U.S.S Enterprise Bridge Playset. Additionally, another series of 12 inch figures were also released, along with a small set of models for the new movie. 

For more information about Mego’s Star Trek: The Motion Picture products, see bottom of page for a complete summary.

Star Trek (1979-1980): 3.75 Inch Basic Figures – Series 1

Mego released six new figures for the first wave of their 3.75 Inch series of action figures. Unfortunately, we didn’t get an Uhura, Sulu or Chekov for this series.

Capt. Kirk

Market Value:
Carded $35 – $50
Loose $10 – $20

Capt. Kirk
Accessories: None
Years Released: 1979, 1980
Scarcity Factor: Moderately easy to find
Notes: Captain James T. Kirk was portrayed by William Shatner in the first Star Trek movie and was of course, the Commanding Officer of the Enterprise. The likeness on the figure was not terrible, but unfortunately it suffered from the paint fading that most Mego 3.75 Inch figures suffered during this time.

Decker

Market Value:
Carded $35 – $50
Loose $10 – $20

Decker
Accessories: None
Years Released: 1979, 1980
Scarcity Factor: Moderately easy to find
Notes: Captain Willard Decker was portrayed by Stephen Collins in the first Star Trek movie and was the Captain of the Enterprise, until relieved by Kirk. This was among the poorest selling figures of the line, and it suffered from the paint fading that most Mego 3.75 Inch figures suffered during this time.

Dr. McCoy

Market Value:
Carded $35 – $50
Loose $10 – $20

Dr. McCoy
Accessories: None
Years Released: 1979, 1980
Scarcity Factor: Moderately easy to find
Notes: Dr. Leonard McCoy was portrayed by Deforest Kelley in the first Star Trek movie and was of course, the Chief Medical Officer of the Enterprise. The likeness on the figure was not terrible, but unfortunately it suffered from the paint fading that most Mego 3.75 Inch figures suffered during this time.

Llia

Market Value:
Carded $35 – $50
Loose $10 – $20

Llia
Accessories: None
Years Released: 1979, 1980
Scarcity Factor: Moderately easy to find
Notes: Lt. Llia was portrayed by Persis Khambatta in the first Star Trek movie and was an officer aboard the Enterprise. Unfortunately, she was among the poorest selling figures of the line, and it suffered from the paint fading that most Mego 3.75 Inch figures suffered during this time.

Mr. Spock

Market Value:
Carded $40 – $55
Loose $10 – $20

Mr. Spock
Accessories: None
Years Released: 1979, 1980
Scarcity Factor: Moderately easy to find
Notes: Mr. Spock was portrayed by Leonard Nimoy in the first Star Trek movie and was of course, the Chief Science Officer of the Enterprise. The likeness on the figure was not terrible, but unfortunately it suffered from the paint fading that most Mego 3.75 Inch figures suffered during this time.

Scotty

Market Value:
Carded $35 – $50
Loose $10 – $20

Scotty
Accessories: None
Years Released: 1979, 1980
Scarcity Factor: Moderately easy to find
Notes: Mr. Scott was portrayed by James Doohan in the first Star Trek movie and was of course, the Chief Engineer of the Enterprise. The likeness on the figure was not terrible, but unfortunately it suffered from the paint fading that most Mego 3.75 Inch figures suffered during this time.

Star Trek (1979-1980): 3.75 Inch Basic Figures – Series 2

Mego released six more figures for their 2nd wave of the Star Trek 3.75 Inch line, but they were only made available in Canada and Italy. It should be noted that a 3-pack was available through the J.C Penny catalog in 1979 containing Klingon, Rigellian and Arcturian. They were shipped in a plain brown box and not carded.

Arcturian

Market Value:
Carded $250 – $350
Loose $70 – $90

Arcturian
Accessories: None
Years Released: 1980
Scarcity Factor: Tough to find on the secondary market
Notes: The Arcturians were a humanoid alien species that resembled melting strawberry ice cream. An Arcturian was briefly seen in the movie but never played a major role. Strangely, the Arcturian figure was featured in yellow instead of the reddish color from the movie.

Betelgeusian

Market Value:
Carded $400 – $500
Loose $150 – $200

Betelgeusian
Accessories: Cloak
Years Released: 1980
Scarcity Factor: Tough to find on the secondary market
Notes: Whatever you do, do not say this guy’s name three times……..but sadly he was not played by Michael Keaton. It should be noted the figure version of this character varies in a few ways from the movie version, mostly the color, costuming, head sculpt and really every other way you can think of.

Klingon

Market Value:
Carded $450 – $550
Loose $90 – $120

Klingon
Accessories: None
Years Released: 1980
Scarcity Factor: Tough to find on the secondary market
Notes: What is a Star Trek action figure line without a Klingon? Of course, the Klingons were drastically changed from the old TV show to the movies and this figure is proof of that. The figure is actually pretty nice, but sadly suffers from the paint fading that most Mego 3.75 Inch figures suffered during this time.

Megarite

Market Value:
Carded $400 – $500
Loose $70 – $90

Megarite
Accessories: Cloak
Years Released: 1980
Scarcity Factor: Tough to find on the secondary market
Notes: Besides the Klingon, this was the most accurate looking figure in relation to the movie. The Megarite could be briefly seen in the first Star Trek movie. The figure comes with a cool looking cloak and is actually a really nice looking figure. This is among the harder Alien figures to find nowadays.

Rigellian

Market Value:
Carded $300 – $400
Loose $70 – $90

Rigellian
Accessories: None
Years Released: 1980
Scarcity Factor: Tough to find on the secondary market
Notes: The Rigellian looks like a pretty cool figure but it isn’t actually a Rigellian. Mego confused him for another race of aliens called the Saurians. Still, this is good head sculpt. A 12 Inch version of this figure was planned for that line, but never made it to production.

Zaranite

Market Value:
Carded $250 – $350
Loose $50 – $75

Zaranite
Accessories: None
Years Released: 1980
Scarcity Factor: Tough to find on the secondary market
Notes: The Zaranite figure is another interesting looking character with a solid head sculpt for this line. The Zaranite were a race of aliens that could be seen briefly in the movie. Fun Fact: These aliens only wear their breathing masks when on Earth due to the atmosphere. They don’t normally have them on.

Star Trek (1979-1980): 3.75 Inch Playsets

Mego released only one playset for their 3.75 Inch Star Trek 3.75 Inch action figure series with the U.S.S. Enterprise Bridge playset. A Vulcan Shuttle attachment to the Enterprise Bridge was proposed, but sadly never made it to release.

U.S.S. Enterprise Bridge

Market Value:
Boxed $475 – $600
Loose $100 – $150

U.S.S. Enterprise Bridge
Accessories: Plastic Bridge Playset, Captain’s Chair, Helm Control, Navigational Station, Science Center, Communications Console, Docking Port
Years Released: 1980
Scarcity Factor: Tough to find on the secondary market
Notes: This U.S.S. Enterprise Bridge Playset was the only playset or vehicle released for the 3.75 Inch line, and was made up of vacuum-formed plastic. This made the set very flimsy and subject to tearing. All computer consoles and chairs were made of the same flimsy plastic material, so you can understand that a complete boxed version of this particular set is very hard to find on the secondary market and will command top dollar. The docking port to the right of this set was meant to work with a proposed Vulcan Shuttle that ultimately never made to release.

Star Trek (1979-1980): 3.75 Inch Vehicles / Accessories

No accessories or vehicles were produced for the 3.75 Inch Star Trek line, but Mego did produce three models related to the action figure line. This was an unusual move for Mego, because it was the first time they had created a model kit for retail.

Klingon Cruiser Model

Market Value:
Boxed $300 – $450
Loose $75 – $125

Klingon Cruiser Model
Accessories: Model Kit, Stand, Instructions, Decals
Years Released: 1980
Scarcity Factor: Rare and don’t come along often
Notes: Model Kits of the Klingon war ship had been done before this one, but this was the first for Mego and also the first model based on the new Motion Picture Klingon ship. These Mego model kits are crazy hard to find in boxed format and can command top dollar on the secondary market. *This photo was provided by the wonderful Mego Museum website.

U.S.S. Enterprise Model

Market Value:
Boxed $325 – $475
Loose $75 – $125

U.S.S. Enterprise Model
Accessories: Model Kit, Stand, Instructions, Decals
Years Released: 1980
Scarcity Factor: Rare and don’t come along often
Notes: Model Kits of the Enterprise had been done before this one, but this was the first for Mego and also the first model based on the new Motion Picture Enterprise ship. These Mego model kits are crazy hard to find in boxed format and can command top dollar on the secondary market. *This photo was provided by the wonderful Mego Museum website.

Vulcan Shuttle Model

Market Value:
Boxed $325 – $475
Loose $75 – $125

Vulcan Shuttle Model
Accessories: Model Kit, Stand, Instructions, Decals
Years Released: 1980
Scarcity Factor: Rare and don’t come along often
Notes: The Vulcan Shuttle Model Kit was a first for Mego, in that it was the first time Mego had made model kits and it was also the first time this vehicle had been made into a model. These Mego model kits are crazy hard to find in boxed format and can command top dollar on the secondary market.

Star Trek (1979-1980): 12 Inch Basic Figures

In addition to the twelve 3.75 Inch figures, Mego also released six different figures for their 12 Inch format as well. Sadly, we did not get a 12 Inch version of McCoy or Scotty.

Arcturian

Market Value:
Boxed $60 – $85
Loose $15 – $30

Arcturian
Accessories: Cloth Jumpsuit, Shoes, Decal
Years Released: 1979, 1980
Scarcity Factor: Can still be found but it’s getting tougher each year
Notes: The Arcturians were a humanoid alien species that resembled melting strawberry ice cream. Strangely, the Arcturian figure was featured in yellow instead of the reddish color from the movie. The 12″ version had a beautiful head sculpt and was quite well done.

Capt. Kirk

Market Value:
Boxed $60 – $85
Loose $15 – $30

Capt. Kirk
Accessories: Cloth Uniform Top, Pants, Shoes
Years Released: 1979, 1980
Scarcity Factor: Moderately easy to find
Notes: Captain Kirk was portrayed by William Shatner in the Star Trek movies and was of course, the Commanding Officer of the Enterprise. The likeness of the 12″ figure is really nice and definitely resembles Shatner. Sadly, the figure usually suffers from a graying in the face due to chemicals used to make the figure.

Decker

Market Value:
Boxed $125 – $175
Loose $50 – $75

Decker
Accessories: Cloth Uniform Top, Pants, Shoes
Years Released: 1979, 1980
Scarcity Factor: Can still be found but it’s getting tougher each year
Notes: Captain Willard Decker was portrayed by Stephen Collins in the first Star Trek movie and was the Captain of the Enterprise, until relieved by Kirk. Despite the fact that most Trek fans didn’t really care much about the character, the Decker 12″ figure is among the harder to find for the line.

Klingon

Market Value:
Boxed $90 – $120
Loose $30 – $45

Klingon
Accessories: Cloth Shirt, Pants, Chest Armor, Shoes, Laser Pistol
Years Released: 1979, 1980
Scarcity Factor: Can still be found but it’s getting tougher each year
Notes: What is a Star Trek action figure line without a Klingon? Of course, the Klingons were drastically changed from the old TV show to the movies and this figure is proof of that. The 12″ version of this figure is really well done with a beautiful head sculpt and outfit.

Llia

Market Value:
Boxed $60 – $85
Loose $15 – $30

Llia
Accessories: Cloth Dress
Years Released: 1979, 1980
Scarcity Factor: Can still be found but it’s getting tougher each year
Notes: Lt. Llia was portrayed by Persis Khambatta in the first Star Trek movie and was an officer aboard the Enterprise. Unfortunately, she was among the poorest selling figures of both the 3.75″ and 12″ lines. It was probably a mistake by Mego to focus so much attention on this character that many Trek fans wouldn’t care about.

Mr. Spock

Market Value:
Boxed $60 – $85
Loose $15 – $30

Mr. Spock
Accessories: Cloth Uniform Top, Pants, Shoes
Years Released: 1979, 1980
Scarcity Factor: Moderately easy to find
Notes: Mr. Spock was portrayed by Leonard Nimoy in the first Star Trek movie and was of course, the Chief Science Officer of the Enterprise. The likeness of the 12″ figure is really nice and definitely resembles the actor. Sadly, the figure usually suffers from a graying in the face due to chemicals used to make the figure.

Star Trek (1979-1980): 12 Inch Playsets

Mego did not release any playsets for their 12 Inch Star Trek action figure series.

Star Trek (1979-1980): 12 Inch Vehicles / Accessories

Mego did not release any vehicles or accessories for their 12 Inch Star Trek action figure series.

By 1979, Star Wars had taken the toy industry by storm and all the other toy companies across the globe were just trying to catch up by finding the next big thing. Mego toys had famously passed up the opportunity to make toys based on the Star Wars movie, so they were desperate to find their own powerhouse science fiction franchise. After already snatching up licensing deals with Logan’s Run, Space 1999 and Disney’s The Black Hole, Mego now decided to produce toys based on the new Star Trek movie being released in 1979. Mego already had a licensing deal with Paramount to produce toys from the classic Star Trek television show, and were also granted permission to create the movie toy line as well with very high hopes. Star Trek the Motion Picture turned out to be mildly successful at box office, but met with mixed reviews that left many fans scratching their heads. This translated over to the merchandising items for the movie as well, including Mego’s action figure lines. Mego had big plans for the line but the lack of big demand at the box office meant an early end to the line. Many products were left unproduced and The Star Trek Motion Picture line of action figures proved to be a bit of a disappointment for Mego, which were one of many reasons why they met with an untimely end a couple of years later.

The Star Trek Motion Picture Series toy line actually featured two different action figure lines with a classic 12 Inch series, along with a new 3.75 Inch series as well. The 3.75 Inch series was the main line and featured two waves containing twelve figure in total. Wave 1 included most of the main characters aboard the Enterprise, including Captain Kirk, Mr. Spock, Dr. McCoy, Mr. Scott, Captain Decker, and Lt. Llia. Sadly, Mego did not produce figures based on the rest of the Enterprise crew, Uhura, Chekov and Sulu. Just like the classic Mego television series line, the 2nd series contained all aliens with Arcturian, Betelgeusian, Klingon, Megarite, Rigellian and Zaranite. Unfortunately, all six figure from Series 2 were only released in Canada and Italy, making them difficult to find nowadays. The U.S.S Enterprise Bridge Playset, was also released for the 3.75 Inch line. For the 12 Inch line, Mego produced six characters, including Captain Kirk, Mr. Spock, Decker, Llia, Klingon and Arcturian. Mego’s head sculpts for the 12 inch figures are actually quite nice with a lot of attention to likeness details. The 3.75 Inch line suffered the typical paint jobs that other Mego lines endured at the time with a lot of paint fading. A series of ship models were also produced but are incredibly difficult to find on the secondary market.

The packaging for the 12 Inch and 3.75 Inch lines of Star Trek were very similar, and they definitely fit the theme of the line with a great portrait of the Enterprise flying among the clouds with all character portraits just below it. The 3.75 inch was the basic blister pack Mego design with the figure inside of a bubble on the right side of the package, and the previously described Star Trek artwork on the left. The classic Star Trek movie logo was across the top of the blister pack. The name of the each character is just above each bubble in small red letters. The 12 inch versions featured the same artwork and portraits on the left, with the figure to the right side of the box. The logo was once again across the top of the packaging. There was a large sized window on the right side over the figure, where you could see inside. The Star Trek action figure packaging was actually very attractive and definitely grabbed your attention on the toy shelves.

3.75 Inch Card Back
Movie Poster
Lunch Box
12 Inch Package Back
McDonald’s Happy Meals
McDonald’s Happy Meal Ad
Knickerbocker Soft Spock
Knickerbocker Soft Kirk